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Prevalence of Moderate Malnutrition in School-age Children and Its Association with Hypertension and Microalbuminuria

Prevalence of Moderate Malnutrition in School-age Children and Its Association with Hypertension and Microalbuminuria
Ranti Astria Hannah, Nanan Sekarwana, Sjarief H Effendi
Universitas Padjadjaran, American Journal of Clinical Medicine Research. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2017, pp 6-9, doi: 10.12691/ajcmr-5-1-2., http://pubs.sciepub.com/ajcmr/5/1/2
Bahasa Inggris
Universitas Padjadjaran, American Journal of Clinical Medicine Research. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2017, pp 6-9, doi: 10.12691/ajcmr-5-1-2., http://pubs.sciepub.com/ajcmr/5/1/2
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Background. Previous studies has linked childhood severe malnutrition with hypertension; also association between hypertension and microalbuminuria. Currently there is no study on blood pressure and microalbuminuria in moderately malnourished school-age children. Methodology/Principal Findings. A cross-sectional study on children aged 6?12 years from 3 public elementary schools in Bandung, Indonesia between July to September 2016. Weight, height and blood pressure of subjects were measured. Nutritional status were determined using WHO Child Growth Standards. Blood pressure levels were classified, and microalbuminuria were measured using Advia 1800 Analyzer (Siemens, Germany). Sample size was calculated with 18% estimated prevalence, 95% confidence, and 5% precision. Prevalence data were presented as percentage. Differences of blood pressure and microalbuminuria in moderately malnourished and well-nourished subjects were analyzed using Mann Whitney dan Chi-square tests, statistical significance was represented by p<0,05. Out of 235 subjects, 74 were moderately malnourished (prevalence 31,5%) and 161 were well-nourished. The median of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and microalbuminuria in the moderately malnourished group were 95 mmHg; 62,5 mmHg; and 5,5 mcg/mg respectively, compared to 95 mmHg; 60 mmHg; and 4 mcg/mg respectively (p=0,741; 0,495; 0,217). Conclusions. The prevalence of moderate malnutrition in Indonesian school-age children is quite high. There were no significant differences of blood pressure and microalbuminuria between moderately malnourished and well-nourished children.

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